Studies on asthma medication and the epidemic

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Research Study

Asthma Epidemic

Title:

“Asthma on the increase in spite of medical attempts for treatment.”

This paper published in Paediatrics 2002 details how asthma rates have increased more than 160% in children aged under 5, and 74% in children aged 5 to 14 since 1981. This is despite concerted medical attempts to address this problem and to treat asthma effectively.

Today, asthma is the most chronic childhood illness affecting as many as 5 million children. It accounts for an estimated 11.8 million school days missed per year in the U.S., as well as a significant loss of parental work days.

In 1994, the US spent an estimated $10.7 billion on asthma.

Paediatrics 2002;109:857-865, 919-930.

    With asthma at such epidemic proportions, a natural approach such as chiropractic just may be the answer.

 

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Research Study

Asthma and Medication

The results of the worlds largest asthma study, published in 2001 in the European Respiratory Journal further supports the link between paracetamol use and an increased susceptibility to asthma. This study was carried out across 22 countries and involved over 140 000 participants.

Results:

The researchers noted that asthma and allergy symptoms were most prevalent in countries with per capita sales of paracetamol averaging over 20mg per year.

European Respiratory Journal 2001; 18:598-611

 

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Research Study

Asthma and Medication

Title:

“The Melbourne Asthma Study 1964-1999”.

A group of children with a past history of wheezing were randomly selected from the Melbourne community at the age of seven years in 1964, and a further group of children with severe wheezing was selected at the age of ten years.

The subjects were followed prospectively at seven year intervals with the last review in 1999.

Results:

The majority of children who had only a few episodes of wheezing associated with symptoms of a respiratory infection had a benign course, with many ceasing to wheeze by adulthood.

Authors Comments:

“The Melbourne study has provided further confirmation of the favourable outcome of children whose episodes of wheezing are associated with symptoms of a respiratory infection…It is important that this group of children with minor wheezing not be over treated, especially with therapy that may have long term side effects….This point needs to be repeatedly made to parents who can become anxious about the recurrent episodes and seek curative treatment.

Phelan PD, Robertson CF, Olinsky A

Journal Allergy Clinical Immunological 2002 

    This study suggests that medication should not be the first approach for children who exhibit episodes of wheezing.

 

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