Childhood Headache studies

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Research Study

Childhood Headache

Title:

“Relation between headache in childhood and physical and psychiatric symptoms in adulthood: national birth cohort study.”

This study published in the British Medical Journal 2001 determined that children with frequent headaches are at an elevated risk of headaches and other conditions during adulthood.

The study involved 17,414 subjects. These subjects were tracked from age 7 to age 33.

In total, 8.2% of participants suffered from headaches at age 7. This figure was 14% at age 33.

The researchers claimed that children with headaches were more than twice as likely to suffer from headaches as adults. They were also significantly more likely to develop other physical and psychiatric symptoms, compared with headache-free youngsters
Fearon P, Hotopf M Brit Med Jou 2001 (May 12);   322 (7295):   1145

    We know that chiropractic can help children who suffer from headaches.

 Surely this is further evidence of the importance of regular chiropractic check ups for children.

Web hosting in Iceland - OrangeWebsite.com

Screen Shot 2016-01-31 at 3.18.08 PM

Childhood Headache

Title:

“Relation between headache in childhood and physical and psychiatric symptoms in adulthood: national birth cohort study.”

According to scientists in the British Medical Journal published in 2001, children with frequent headaches are at an elevated risk of headaches and other conditions during adulthood.

Investigators analysed 17,414 subjects from ages seven to thirty-three.

Results:

8.2% of participants suffered from headaches at age 7, and 14% by age 33. Children with headaches had double the chance of suffering from headaches as adults. They were also significantly more likely to develop other physical and psychiatric symptoms, compared with headache-free youngsters.

These findings confirm that children with headaches do not simply “grow out” of their physical complaint, but may instead “grow into” others, say the authors.

Fearon P, Hotopf M. BMJ 2001; 322 (7295): 1145-8.

    This study demonstrates that children do not simply ‘grow out’ of headaches. Further evidence for the importance of an early chiropractic assessment for children.

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