Antibiotics and ear infections study

Web hosting in Iceland - OrangeWebsite.com

Screen Shot 2016-01-31 at 3.18.08 PM

Research Study

Antibiotic and Ear Infections

Title:

“Primary care based randomised, double blind trial of amoxicillin versus placebo for acute otitis media in children aged under 2 years”

Researchers in the Netherlands report that children should not be given antibiotics when they initially present with ear infections.

This study looked at 240 children, aged six months to two years, with acute otitis media. The children were prescribed either placebo or 40 mg/kg per day of amoxicillin.

Results:

Compared with children who were given placebo, patients who took amoxicillin were:

Only 13% less likely to exhibit persistent symptoms at day four.

Less likely to take pain medication.

There was no significant difference between the two groups in otoscopic findings, pain duration, or crying.

In addition, tympanometric findings in both groups were similar at a six week follow up assessment.

Damoiseaux RAMJ, van Balen FAM, Hoes AW, Verheij TJM, de Melker RA.. BMJ ­ 2000;320:350-4.

    Further evidence that antibiotics should not be the first approach for children with ear infections. 

Screen Shot 2016-01-31 at 3.18.08 PM

Research Study

Antibiotics and Ear Infections

Title:

“Clinical Evidence Shows Limited Effect of Antibiotic Treatment on Children With Acute Otitis Media.”

Web hosting in Iceland - OrangeWebsite.com

A study conducted by the Southern California/RAND Evidence based Practice Centre (EPC) looked into the apparent benefits of antibiotic therapy as a treatment for acute otitis media.

Results:

The researchers determined that nearly two-thirds of children with uncomplicated acute otitis media recover from pain and fever within 24 hours of diagnosis without treatment by antibiotics. 

In addition to this over 80% recover from pain and fever within one to seven days.

Press Release, August 9, 2000. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. 

    Yet another study which demonstrates that antibiotics should not be the first approach for children with acute ear infections.

 

Screen Shot 2016-01-31 at 3.18.08 PM

 

Research Study

Antibiotics and Ear Infections

Title:

“Pragmatic randomised controlled trial of two prescribing strategies for childhood acute otitis media.”

This study published in the British Medical Journal in 2001 validates the concern that chiropractors have held for decades about the aggressive use of antibiotics in children with ear infection.

A total of 315 children, with acute otitis media were assigned to 1 of 2 groups The first group was a 72 hour waiting period with no antibiotic use. The second group received immediate antibiotic intervention.

Results:

“Immediate antibiotic prescription provided symptomatic benefit mainly after the first 24 hours, when symptoms were already resolving.”

Only 9% of children in the ‘watchful waiting’ group developed diarrhoea, compared with 19% of those taking antibiotics.

Overall, 77% of parents of children in the ‘watchful waiting’ group expressed satisfaction with the care their youngsters received.

Little P, Gould C, Williamson I, Moore M, Warner G, Dunleavey J. BMJ 2001; 322(7282): 336-342

    Further evidence that antibiotics should not be the first approach for children with ear infections.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *