Sanders breaks previous fund raising record after Iowa caucus

Bernie Sanders Shatters His Previous Fundraising Record after Iowa Caucus

 

Bernie has done it again.
Following a strong showing at the Iowa caucus, coming within a razor-thin margin of .2% of the vote compared to Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders shattered his old fundraising record by pulling in over $3 million in contributions in the 24 hours since last night.
“It’s been our best day ever,” said Michael Briggs, Sanders’ communications director.

Jeff Weaver, campaign manager for Sanders, elaborated on their fundraising success. “The numbers we’ve seen since January 1 put our campaign on pace to beat Secretary Clinton’s goal of $50 million in the first quarter of 2016.”

“Working Americans chipping in a few dollars each month are not only challenging but beating the greatest fundraising machine ever assembled.”
The good news comes on the heels of other fundraising milestones for the Vermont senator’s campaign. Just this Sunday, Sanders’ campaign announced that he has received over 3 million individual contributions from around 1.3 million people — a staggering amount for this point in the primary election. He has also stunned pundits by reaping in $20 million in January alone.
Sanders has made campaign finance reform a key point in his campaign goals, and he frequently reference the fact that he does not use super PAC money, and instead relies on individual contributions. Judging from a tweet made just today by his official page, that position remains very much unchanged:

 

The average contribution to Sanders’ campaign is just $27. 
Meanwhile, Clinton’s campaign funding has included a wide variety of corporate and private interests, a contrast which Senator Sanders put to good use, calling her out on her massive, hundred-thousand dollar speaking fees for large banks. A popular meme, which Politifact rated as being “Mostly True,” underscores the vast difference in their funding sources.

List of all top donors to the Clinton and Sanders campaigns.

Sanders’ campaign has cast the recent Iowa near-tie as a victory, proving the full legitimacy of his campaign before heading to New Hampshire’s first-in-the-nation primary, where he holds a commanding double-digit lead.

Bernie has done it again.
Following a strong showing at the Iowa caucus, coming within a razor-thin margin of .2% of the vote compared to Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders shattered his old fundraising record by pulling in over $3 million in contributions in the 24 hours since last night.
“It’s been our best day ever,” said Michael Briggs, Sanders’ communications director.

Jeff Weaver, campaign manager for Sanders, elaborated on their fundraising success. “The numbers we’ve seen since January 1 put our campaign on pace to beat Secretary Clinton’s goal of $50 million in the first quarter of 2016.”

“Working Americans chipping in a few dollars each month are not only challenging but beating the greatest fundraising machine ever assembled.”
The good news comes on the heels of other fundraising milestones for the Vermont senator’s campaign. Just this Sunday, Sanders’ campaign announced that he has received over 3 million individual contributions from around 1.3 million people — a staggering amount for this point in the primary election. He has also stunned pundits by reaping in $20 million in January alone.
Sanders has made campaign finance reform a key point in his campaign goals, and he frequently reference the fact that he does not use super PAC money, and instead relies on individual contributions. Judging from a tweet made just today by his official page, that position remains very much unchanged:
Meanwhile, Clinton’s campaign funding has included a wide variety of corporate and private interests, a contrast which Senator Sanders put to good use, calling her out on her massive, hundred-thousand dollar speaking fees for large banks. A popular meme, which Politifact rated as being “Mostly True,” underscores the vast difference in their funding sources.

List of all top donors to the Clinton and Sanders campaigns.

Sanders’ campaign has cast the recent Iowa near-tie as a victory, proving the full legitimacy of his campaign before heading to New Hampshire’s first-in-the-nation primary, where he holds a commanding double-digit lead.

The average contribution to Sanders’ campaign is just $27. 

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