Scientists Trial New Nasal Spray for Autism

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3738956/Sydney-scientists-trial-new-nasal-spray-used-treat-autism-five-years.html

 

A nasal spray could become a ground-breaking new treatment for autism that has already shown increased levels of responsiveness and awareness from trial patients.

A synthetically made version of oxytocin, also known as the ‘cuddle hormone’, will allow individuals with autism to become more social and has proved to have incredible results.

Professor Adam Guastella from the University of Sydney’s Brain and Mind Centre, who is leading the project, has said trials had proved to be extremely promising so far.

‘The sorts of results that we have in our trials suggest children show more responsiveness and awareness of the important social information in a relationship,’ Prof Guastella toldĀ 9News.

‘They seem to be able to remember that information more effectively.’

Autism spectrum disorder and autism are both general terms for a complex group of disorders that affect brain development.

It is characterised with varying degrees of difficulties in social interaction both verbal and non-verbal.

Christine Blue’s son Hayden who was diagnosed with autism when he was only two years old said that he has been a participant in the trial.

‘Hayden was happy to be included in a group, he wouldn’t go off on his own and his eye contact was better,’ she told 9News.

‘His general engagement with another person is better.’

Professor Adam Guastella (pictured) from the University of Sydney’s Brain and Mind Centre who is heading the project has said that trials have proved to be extremely promising so far

New drug trialled to treat social awareness for people with autism

Christine Blue’s son Hayden (pictured with mother Christine) who was diagnosed with autism when he was only two-years-old said that he has been a participant in the trial

It is believed the new treatment could also be proved useful to treat anxiety and other neurological conditions and participants who would like to take part in the trial are being advised to contact the centre.

Professor Guastella said if all went to plan the drug could be used commercially for people with autism within the next five years.

Autism lasts is a lifelong condition and affects about one in 100 Australians or 230,000 people.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3738956/Sydney-scientists-trial-new-nasal-spray-used-treat-autism-five-years.html#ixzz4HMX0BntC
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *